Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - a Close up of a bee on a yellow flower

5 Native Plants to Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden

Want to invite some buzzing bees back into your garden?

 Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - An Australian wattle bush with a bee in the middle of some wattle flower collecting pollen

 

 

This list of beautiful, native plants is just what you need!

We all know how important bees are to our ecosystem and that our modern agricultural methods and reliance on toxic pesticides has seen a huge decline in bee numbers over the years.

Although this is not good news, there are ways that we can help the plight of the bees by stopping the use of pesticides in our homes and gardens and by planting flowers that are favoured by bees.

 

1. Jelly Bush

Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - Australian Manuka Jelly Bush

 

The jelly bush is a native Australian shrub which is also known as Australian Manuka Honey or Australian Bush Honey. For a long time, it was thought that Manuka Honey came only from New Zealand, but here in Australia we too can produce a Manuka Honey from our Jelly Bush shrub. A sun-loving, drought-resistant plant with arching branches that can grow to be around 3 metres tall and 2 metres wide, makes the Jelly Bush perfect as a hedge or as a screening plant. In spring, the Jelly Bush will be covered in tiny white flowers which are rich in nectar that not only attracts bees but butterflies and other pollinating insects as well. Grown naturally on the east coast, the Jelly Bush is low maintenance and drought-resistant evergreen that loves sub-tropical and warm temperatures. Best planted in a sunny to a partially shaded area and is tolerant of frost once established.

2. Gorse Bitter Pea

 Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - Gorse Bitter pea with bright yellow flowers

This hardy and spiny plant not only has an amazingly pretty bright yellow flower with a deep red centre, but it's also fabulously drought hardy. Typically found in bushfire-prone areas, the Gorse Bitter Pea is very tolerant of poor growing conditions. Particularly after been ravished by a bushfire, the Gorse Bitter Pea seeds release, regenerate and at the same time improves soil quality by releasing nitrogen back into the soil. Loved by bees and butterflies for the pollen, the Gorse Bitter Pea is also loved by small mammals, reptiles and birds who use the spikey undergrowth for refuge.

 

3. Grevillea.

 Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - Red Grevillea

This funky flowered shrub comes in all sizes, from ground covers, small shrubs to big trees that can grow up to 15m! The brightly coloured, petal-less plant is also known as a spider plant, silky oak or the toothbrush plant. A favourite with nectar loving honey-eaters and bees alike. But did you know that traditionally Aboriginals would take the flower and shake it into their hand to release the nectar to mix with water to make a sweet drink? Although I strongly suggest that you try it with your backyard grevillea as commonly cultivated grevilleas actually produce cyanide.

 

4. Hardenberg

 Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - branches of purple and lilac Hardenberg also known as the happy wanderer

The Hardenberg is a pea variety and has several names that it goes by such as the happy wanderer, native lilac, false sarsaparilla or coral pea. This gorgeous evergreen climber has the most stunning purple flowers that come out in winter and can be found along coastal ranges spanning from Queensland and New South Wales all the through to Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia. Super easy to grow, from cuttings or seeds while it can spread it is considered non evasive and makes a beautiful informal screen. As some native bees prefer native plants to feast on, the happy wanderer is perfect for attracting native bees into your garden.

 

5. Westringia 

 

 Collombatti Naturals 5 native Plants To Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden Blog - Close up of a Westringia

Also known as coastal rosemary, this is one shrub the bees really adore! What makes it even more inviting to have in your garden is that it's really easy to grow and other than an occasional trim to keep it in shape, it's very much low-maintenance. This tough, drought hardy shrub is found all along the East coast of Australia. Dotted with little hairy white to lavender coloured flowers, it typically blooms in spring and autumn. Having said that, we have a few in our garden and they seem to flower all year round and you can always find a few bees foraging amongst the little flowers. Although it may be known as native rosemary, it is only because of the leaf shape. Neither the leaves nor the flowers of the Westringia have a strong aroma.

That wraps up our 5 Native Plants to Help Create a Bee Friendly Garden and I have to say, I've really enjoyed researching these plants and hope that I have imparted a little wisdom to you all.

Back to blog